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Donate to Help Nepal Earthquake Victims and Get a Free Travel Writing Course

By Dave Fox
Singapore
April 27, 2015

[Until May 5, 2015, I am donating 100 percent of the money I earn via this page from my online Travel Journaling and Travel Writing & Publishing to Oxfam International’s Nepal earthquake relief fund. To donate and receive a free online travel writing class, please scroll down to the final section of this article … or keep reading for more about why I feel such a close connection with Nepal.]

Kattina with new friends in Kathmandu: We have tried contacting them to see if they are okay and are still awaiting a response.

Kattina with new friends in Kathmandu: We have tried contacting them to see if they are okay and are still awaiting a response.

Kattina and I were deeply saddened by the earthquake that devastated Nepal this past weekend. I spent two weeks there Last December / January, and Kattina stayed on for a third week to go trekking in the Himalayas. We have had many amazing trips around Asia during the nearly four years we’ve been living in Singapore, but Nepal was special.

One of the things that made our trip to Nepal special was the people. In one of the world’s poorest countries, we encountered a gentleness and a generosity of spirit that was pervasive everywhere we went. During our short stay, we developed many friendships with local residents.

In Kathmandu, a group of four invited us to sit at their restaurant table and introduced us to a Nepali drinking ritual.

nepal-homestay-playful-girl-and-family

December, 2014: A young girl flirts with my camera at our village homestay near Chitwan National Park. Authorities believe people in rural areas may have been hit hardest by the Nepal earthquake devastation; however, many communities are unreachable due to damaged roads and disrupted communications.

In Pokhara, a man who rented us bicycles and sold me a bus ticket out of his small shop invited me to have tea with him. We chatted for more than an hour about everything from cycling and photography to family and religion.

On a three-day trek in Chitwan National Park, we spent two nights in a rural village homestay. After dark, when it was not safe to be in the jungle, we spent our evenings cooking, eating, laughing, even dancing with the families who welcomed us into their homes and shared the little they had. That was not only a highlight of Nepal, but one of my most inspirational travel experiences ever.

Our homestay hosts cooked us dinner over a fire on the dirt floor of their kitchen. In spite of a thick language barrier, we hung out with them until late into the evening.

Our homestay hosts cooked us dinner over a fire on the dirt floor of their kitchen. In spite of a thick language barrier, we hung out with them until late into the evening.

Kattina spent six days trekking in the Himalayas with a female guide who introduced her to nature she had dreamed for years of seeing, as well as more small villages and rural mountain life.

Meanwhile, on my last day in Pokhara, a musician and instrument maker invited me to the cinderblock room where he lives to teach me how to play the sarangi, a Nepali folk instrument. That night, I went to hear my new friend, Ram, and his brother, Suk, play a concert at a local restaurant. At the end of the evening, they hugged me and said they wished I was staying in Nepal longer. Just last week, I recorded a video, telling the story of how I met Ram.

We have been trying to contact several of our friends. So far, the only one we have heard from is Kattina’s trekking guide, who checked in as safe on the Nepal Earthquake Facebook Safety Check page.

Poor Infrastructure

December, 2014: Even before the earthquake, Kathmandu suffered from a weak infrastructure and poorly constructed buildings.

December, 2014: Kathmandu’s weak infrastructure and poorly constructed buildings left the city particularly vulnerable to earthquake damage.

Nepal is one of our planet’s poorest countries. Even before the earthquake, it had a badly underdeveloped infrastructure. Some major roadways, even in downtown Kathmandu, were made of dirt and rocks. In rain storms, they turned to mucky swamps. Electricity throughout the country was sporadic. Power went off for several hours every day.

Buildings in Nepal are not built to the standards one finds in developed nations. While an earthquake of this magnitude would be destructive anywhere, it has been cataclysmic in Nepal because many of the buildings there were not properly fortified.

At the time I am writing this, the death toll in the Nepal earthquake has topped 3,200. I have watched that number rise quickly since news of the disaster first broke on Saturday. Officials fear that number could go up a lot more once more information becomes available about conditions in rural areas. Electricity and communications are wiped out in many parts of Nepal. At the time of this writing, little is known about what has happened in many parts of the country. While the devastation reported in Kathmandu is awful, officials fear conditions to be much worse in rural areas that rescue workers have not yet been able to reach.

How You Can Help (and get a free travel writing course)

Nepal's fragile electrical system has left communities without power for days. Daily blackouts were the norm, even before the earthquake.

Nepal’s fragile electrical system has left communities without power for days. Daily blackouts were the norm, even before the earthquake.

I am starting a fund to help victims of the Nepal earthquake, and running a special sale on my online Travel Journaling and Travel Writing & Publishing workshops. If you sign up this week for either of these courses using the special links below, I will donate 100 percent of what you pay to Oxfam International, One of the primary aid organizations in Nepal.

To encourage as many donations as possible, I am also offering reduced prices on both of these courses. You may choose either the sale price of the full price. Either way, all of your money will go to Oxfam’s Nepal earthquake relief efforts.

These offers will be active until Tuesday, May 5. Please note that in order for your money to go to Oxfam, you must sign up using the Paypal links on this page. Please do not sign up on the Udemy website for this fundraiser, as Udemy and its affiliates take a significant percentage of the course fee. If you pay me directly through this page, it will ensure that 100 percent of your money goes where it is urgently needed.

(Udemy affiliates: If you would like to help, please refer people to this page. Please note that you may not use your affiliate links to earn money in regard to this fundraiser. I do not want anybody benefitting financially from other people’s tragedy.)

If you purchase a course here, I will e-mail you a code within 24 hours that will let you sign up for the course(s) for free. 

If you do not feel comfortable donating in this manner, please consider making a donation directly to Oxfam, the International Red Cross, or one of many other relief organizations that is sending aid. (Paypal has a more comprehensive list of aid organizations.)

To donate and receive your free travel writing course, please choose which course(s) you would like, and whether you would like to donate a the special sale price or the full course price. Within 24 hours, I will e-mail you a code that will let you join your course for free.

Once you have signed up, you can work through the video lessons at your own speed whenever you like. You will also have access to an online classroom where you can ask me questions. If you have already signed up for these workshops but would like to donate, you may also give your free course as a gift to anybody you like. The coupon code you receive will be valid indefinitely so you (or they) can start whenever it is convenient.

DONATE HERE

Please choose your course(s) and donation amount from the dropdown menu. You will receive a link to begin your writing course within 24 hours. (Please see the note below if you have any problems.)


Please choose your course(s) and donation amount:



 Again, this offer is only valid via the above “add to cart” link.

I will pass on 100 percent of what you pay to Oxfam International’s
Nepal earthquake relief fund. 

Thank you for donating! 

Having trouble paying? Some people have had problems using this Paypal link. If you are unable to pay using the above button, you can either send me the money via Paypal at dave@globejotting.com, or simply e-mail me, let me know which option(s) you would like to choose, and I will e-mail you an online invoice you can pay with a credit card.


Learn more about the courses here:

Published on Monday, April 27, 2015

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